faq – Methyl-Life Supplements

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What are the best dosage amounts of Methylfolate and Methylcobalamin to take?


It is recommended that you should take an advice from a physician, or a doctor regarding the dosage quantity for yourself. The quantity of dosage differs, depending upon the degree of the MTHFR. People, those are sensitive to drugs, vitamins and supplements; should take care, and perform the research.   According to the Methyl-Life team, you should start slow, with a small quantity. Still, take the feedback from your doctor regarding the dosages, if your blood test comes out to be positive in relation to MTHFR mutation. Get more information on dosages.
Jamie Hope

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What’s the best form of Methylfolate to take? There are so many different versions


Yes, there are several versions of Methylfolate available. It is hard to tell, which is the best, as it depends on the person’s degree of deficiency. Actually, the doctors or physicians, who had tested your blood sample for the deficiency, are the one to decide the best Methylfolate version for you. Try to get the help of the doctors. Certainly, it will help you to reduce the ambiguity regarding the various versions of the Methylfolate. This information now has a dedicated page Methylfolate Types page.
Jamie Hope

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Tell me more about the ingredients in Methyl-Life Complete


Listed in order of importance to the body’s methylation process and the MTHFR gene mutant’s need: Folate [B-9] (as 5-Methylfolate) – This is the bioactive form of the primary enzyme needed for methylation, especially if you have an MTHFR mutation. It by-passes vitamin processing pathways because it is the already- converted form of the vitamin element. So your body can immediately use it.  It is often recommended in daily doses of 3,000-15,000 mcg (3-15 mg) for individuals with an MTHFR defect. B-12 (as Methylcobalamin) – This is the key form of B-12 needed by someone with an MTHFR gene defect – most often B-12 is found in the form ‘Cobalamin’ which requires additional conversions. For the body’s direct use, the methylated form of B-12 is best absorbed in the mouth’s mucous membranes (sublingual or lozenge form is...
Jamie Hope

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How would I know if I have an MTHFR mutation?


Well, you wouldn’t know for sure unless you had a blood test done that came back positive for the variants or defects 677 and 1298 (these are the only variants the test checks against). The symptoms you are facing might give you some good clues about the possibility of this gene mutation affecting you. Check out the Symptoms of MTHFR page to learn more about some of the common symptoms people with MTHFR may have.
Jamie Hope

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To test or not to test – how do I get tested for the MTHFR defects?


Ask your doctor, if he or she will do a simple blood test for you (there are also cheek swab tests available through a lab in Kentucky, have your doctor fill out their form and process the test through them if you have a child and it would be easier than a blood test – https://www.pgxlab.com/mthfr/). It’s entirely possible your doctor may not know much about the MTHFR gene mutations and that you’ll have to do a little educating. In the medical field, it takes about 18 years for something to become ‘known practice’ and these two defects are a relatively recent discovery (1995 for variant 677 and 2001 for variant 1298). A doctor can simply indicate ‘MTHFR gene’ on the lab test request sheet. Many labs around the country are able...
Jamie Hope

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